Thursday, September 3, 2015

Will Your Books Still Be Read 100 Years From Now?


In the left panel on this website, when you scroll the list of writers I admire, you'll see Kristine Kathryn Rusch. She's the author who spells out what to do if you want to be read 100 years from now. I don't recommend these writers lightly.

Each has something worthwhile to impart. Please visit them.

Recently I revisited Kristine's website and scrolled, stopping randomly to re-read an article here and there.

Because Do Want to be Read 100 Years From Now?
is a subject I soapbox about I've included the link to her good advice.

Become a member of Internet Writing Workshop for valuable help to successful writing.
 

Let Your Wordprocessor Be Your Dependable Editor

Advice From The Pros contains a chapter titled, Expedient Wordprocessor Functions. It describes tasks no writer who plans to succeed should ignore.

For example: Appropriate grade-level language, submission word limits, redundancy, misspelled words, spacing, grammar, e-mail submissions.

Boost your earning power with the help of your wordproccesor's built-in abilities.

Become a member of Internet Writing Workshop.

"A Letter From The Rainmakers Daughter" ~ Another Internet Writing Workshop Member's Success


Chioma iwunze-Ibiam, a member of Internet Writing Workshop, announced another success, Chioma says the achievement was due in large part to help of fellow IWW members.
"I am delighted to announce that my short story, A Letter From The Rainmaker's Daughter has been accepted for the September issue of the new print and online versions of A Long Story Short,This story started as a flash piece in the Practice group about two years ago. Months and months of rewrites, after crits from the Prose List, saw it grow into a short story. I hope you enjoy reading it"
Best Regards, Chioma Iwunze Ibiam. Ankara Press Author: Finding Love Again.
 
Creatuve Writing News

Become a member of Internet Writing Workshop to help you become a successful writer.
 

Saturday, August 29, 2015

Official Update on Fires Near Ross Creek Cedars

Just received from official Clark Fork Fire Information <clarkfork2015@gmail.com>

"Fire is still one half mile to the southwest of the Ross Cedar Grove. The fire managers feel pretty good that it would survive if the fire does push that way as it is protected with natural barriers and high humidity where it is located.

"They are also planning to put sprinklers in around the trail.

"Don't forget those trees have survived 1000 years of fire including the 1910 and 1889 fires!"
Comprehensive Map of the region.

The harrowing tales those rugged Montana homesteaders told about surviving the 1910 holocaust in those mountain valleys are in Volume 1 of Behind These Mountains, a trilogy of northwestern Montana. To read their accounts free here, Chapter 18, 1910 Fire.

Due to Forest Fires Montana Hwy. 2 Is Closed Between Essex an Libby, MT

A portion of Montana Hwy. 2 is closed between Essex and  Libby, MT in the Kootenai River Valley. Unconfirmed reports claimed Ross Creek Cedars, the ancient grove near Bull Lake is afire aren't true, fire management officials say.

The latest official information, posted 2 hours ago, is at InciWEB.

As soon as it's received, I'll post the current status I requested from Clark Fork Complex command officials.
 


The latest official information, posted 2 hours ago, is at InciWEB.

As soon as it's received, I'll post the current status I requested from Clark Fork Complex command officials.

Friday, August 28, 2015

Special ~ August 28th Update on Montana & Idaho Wildfires


Fires are expected to burn in The Clark Fork Complex until September 28th, according to the latest estimate posted approximately half an hour ago on  inciWeb, Incident Information System.


Comprehensive Map of the region.

Ross Creek Cedars near Bull Lake, in neighboring Lincoln County, may be spared according to latest information that said the Scotchman Peak fire is one mile from the ancient grove.

Friendsof Scotchman Peaks Wilderness 

Fire Update:

"Infrared technology was able to cut through the smoke and give fire managers a picture of what the fires have been doing under their blanket of smoke over the past few days. The Scotchman's Peaks Fire is now measured at only 1920 acres, a decrease from previous measurements. It continues to burn islands on the interior of the fire and up on the steep, rocky slopes beneath Scotchman #2. Activity on the southern edge of the fire, near Clark Fork, has nearly ceased....
"The Napoleon Fire has continued to grow to the south in un-burned areas below Pillick Ridge, and is now measured at 7,896 acres. Crews have laid hoses along the Pillick Ridge trail, which will be used to knock heat down between Highway 56 and Gin Gulch, where the fire has crossed the ridge. We hope that the firefighters can continue to ensure the safety of homes along the Bull River. 
"The Sawtooth Fire is now measured at 2010 acres. Although two large spots grew together recently, it has (thankfully) not made any progress towards the Ross Creek Cedars.

"In case you missed the announcement yesterday, FSPW received a request to help feed firefighters at the Lakeside Restaurant in Trout Creek, MT. If you would like to help out, please call the Lakeside Restaurant at (406) 827-4458."
The fires in Kootenai (KNF) and Idaho Panhandle National Forests (IDP) include individual fires are the Scotchman Peak (IDP), Whitetail (IDP), Marten Creek (IDP), Sawtooth (KNF), Napoleon (KNF) and Government (KNF). The Northern Rockies Wildland Fire Management Team, under the command of Diane Hutton, are managing all fires in the complex. All of the fires were started by a lightning event that ran across the geographic area. Evacuations along Highway 56 run from milepost 2.7 to milepost 14. Additional resources remain difficult to obtain due to the unprecedented number of fires in the north western states. Firefighter and community safety are the top priorities for all fire suppression actions.

Additional information is in Becky Kramer's August 26th assessment of the Ross Creek Cedar grove.


For an overall assessment of wildfires, read this Bloomberg Business article which gives you their realistic viewpoint. It includes the following:

"The Forest Service, the countrys largest wildland firefighting agency, has spent $800 million trying to control the flames this year, and its only August. As such, 2015 is on track to become the 15th year in a row the agency has laid out roughly $1 billion on firefighting alone. Expenses in some areas are equal to or greater than the value of the threatened property$200,000 to $400,000 per home, according to Bozeman (Mont.)-based Headwaters Economics. Yet the Forest Service doesnt have much choice: It cant just let communities burn. So the service and its partner agencies keep putting out the flames, even though years of study have shown that doing so only leads to even hotter, more devastating fires later."
One quote in the article states,
“If you always do what youve always done, youll always get what youve always got, says Tom Harbour, who, as the chief of the Forest Services fire department, sets the agenda for dozens of other federal, state, county, and municipal agencies and is effectively Americas wildland fire chief. One hundred million people in the West can no longer expect to just pick up the phone, dial 911, and have a Hotshot come and save them.”
The harrowing tales those rugged Montana homesteaders told about surviving the 1910 holocaust in those mountain valleys are in Volume 1 of Behind These Mountains, a trilogy of northwestern Montana. To read their accounts free here, Chapter 18, 1910 Fire.

Sunday, August 23, 2015

Clark Fork Complex - August 23, 2015


So far, the agencies managing the Clark Fork Complex fire area are allowing small fires to burn. Clark Fork Complex (August 23, 2015) and August 22, 2015.

 
Our daughter and husband, Annette and Wayne Hill, who live in Noxon, Montana, have been driving to about the 8 mile marker on Hwy 56, part of the Clark Fork Complex, every day. They turn back there, at the Bull River Ranch where I grew up.

Yesterday [August 22] she said they see numerous fires on the mountain slopes bordering each side of Hwy. 56, which appear to be an acre in size.

Hills own and operate Wayne Hill Outfitting in Noxon. Both are life-long residents and grew up exploring the mountains, enjoying hiking, berry picking, fishing, fun family excursions and hunting. After logging became unprofitable, they established their hunting guide service. Wayne Hill Outfitting soon became the premier outfitting service in that area.

Having lived near Noxon for sixty years, we realize the gravity of the situation. In reality, there simply isn't manpower or resources, and most of the roads listed no longer provide sufficient access to the affected areas.

It was a similar situation in 1910, long before the Civilian Conservation Corps built roads into those mountains. However timbermen and their crews, and hundreds of imported men walked into the mountains and fought them as best they could.


Finally, Mother Nature blew the scattered small fires into a firestorm that nothing halted .... until finally the rains came in early September

God willing, this year weather conditions will keep the small fires from spreading, and fall rains will come to the rescue soon.


The harrowing tales those rugged Montana homesteaders told about surviving the 1910 holocaust in those mountain valleys are in Volume 1 of Behind These Mountains, a trilogy of northwestern Montana. To read their accounts free here, Chapter 18, 1910 Fire.

Chapter 14, Laying Out The Forest Service System, relates the beginning of forest management in the region. The CCC stories and pictures are in Behind These Mountains, Vol. 2